The recent national creepy clown trend has some people here concerned.

Fargo Police were called to check out a clown after he was spotted wearing his costume to a gig.

That has led to some concerns among the clown community.

You've likely seen videos and stories of these scary clown sightings around the country.

Most of the time the stories help promote the fear of the once beloved icon.

This however is different.

Fargo–Moorhead has a pretty vibrant clown community.

"Clowns are a unique thing. There's many, many people in town that make a living entertaining for kids parties as clowns," says Gompf Display owner Jim Gompf.

Debbie Fowler has been clowning around for 13 years as "Laditzy".

To her clowns are still the friendly goofy characters they were meant to be.

"They just bring laughter and joy. There have been clowns that I know that have had such an impact on people's lives, especially children," says Fowler.

Fowler has a disabled son who has been clowning with her on occasion for nine years.

"Clowning actually helped him come out of his shell you know he was pretty quiet, pretty shy and I would not want anybody to ridicule him and give him a hard time.," says Fowler.

If you're out and about and you stumble upon a clown and you have some concerns, Debbie says not to worry.

There are certain ways to tell the difference between a professional clown and somebody who may be posing as one.

Knowing these thing may help prevent calling the police on somebody when they're just doing their job.

Real clowns never wear masks whereas many of these imposters wear an often ghoulish plastic mask.

Real clowns are also trained to never intentionally scare someone.

"They're trying to get attention I'm sure that's one thing and negative attention is still attention. They think it's funny and it's not," Fowler says.

Professional clowns like Debbie will just have to do their best to separate the real clowns from the spooky imposters.