Fargo Native American Commission Shows Support For Missing Savanna Greywind

More than 300 people came to Oak Grove Park in Fargo to lift morale before continuing the search

FARGO, N.D. — It’s been one week since Savanna Greywind was last seen and the community’s efforts to bring her home are continually growing.

More than 300 people came to Oak Grove Park in Fargo to lift morale before continuing the search.

“No matter what the situation is, that it’s a community of caring people that pull together and we pull together in peace and harmony,” said Rebecca Knutson, a member of the Fargo Native American Commission.

Warne says members of the tribes treat one another like family, and Savanna is no different.

“We have a very special way of how we relate with one another and we make family all the time even though we’re not blood related but we carry that spirit of family in our hearts and we adopt one another,” said Maylynn Warne, a member of the Fargo Native American Commission.

The event served as an opportunity for friends, families and people in the metro to feel support and guidance in this hard time.

“I think the picnic represents bringing together family to support and pray for Savanna and that she’s brought home,” said Warne.

The Fargo Native American Commission has an annual picnic but this year, they decided to dedicate the gathering to Savanna and walk in her honor.

“We have a disappearance of one of our sisters and so we decided to not have a lot of the fun and games we usually do and we’re just here to support the family,” said Lenore King, a member of the Fargo Native American Commission.

Although the event may differ from previous years, they say it really highlights its true purpose.

“This community event today, even though we’ve took some events out, I think it’s still exactly where it should be. It’s community, and what a better way to do a community event than to come and show support for this family and that we’re here for them,” said Tanya Redroad, a member of the Fargo Native American Commission.

Healing songs and prayers began after the picnic.

People then began walking to the Veterans Memorial Bridge for a compilation of prayers.

Walkers wore red or shirts saying who to call if you have information.

“So red is kind of one of the colors for the murdered, missing, indigenous women and it’s kind of a movement,” said Redroad.

Whether you’re showing support by wearing a red shirt or donating food and water, they say anything will be helpful in the search for Savanna.

“I saw on Facebook earlier today that post it notes were being needed. Probably to help mark where people are walking,” said Knutson.

We will provide continuing coverage on the search for Savanna.  Anyone with information is asked to call (701) 235–7335.

Categories: Community, Local News, News Landing Page, North Dakota News