Red Flag Warning makes for dangerous fire conditions

"That red flag warning is really a big deal because if you have a fire start wind like today will just set it off and spread it right down the pasture and right down the field."

NORTH DAKOTA & MINNESOTA (KVRR) — Due to dry conditions A red flag warning has been issued throughout North Dakota and Western Minnesota.

“That red flag warning is really a big deal because if you have a fire start wind like today will just set it off and spread it right down the pasture and right down the field,”Fargo Fire Department’s Fire Marshal, Ryan Erickson said.

Fire Marshal for the Fargo Fire department, Ryan Erickson says there are some areas that are more vulnerable to fires.

“We have that concern also we don’t want any sort of grass fires. We have areas in town where there’s grass and trees,” said Erickson.

Due to low humidity and high winds officials say dry conditions such as these dead leaves and this bush right here could cause a wildfire under a red flag warning.

“We have that combination generally across the entire state right now, but you could tell where those three factors have come together in the right combination that tells us that if a fire starts in those areas we would have rapid fire spread to those areas,” Fire Prevention Supervisor, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Casey McCoy said.

With abnormally dry conditions the Grand Forks County Sheriff’s office has issued a temporary burn ban stating anyone who in violation will be guilty of a class B misdemeanor.

Erickson stresses the importance of how quickly a fire can spread.

“So weather conditions are really at a point where fires can start easily and then they can really get out of control. A day like today is where we can see those start easily and then the winds will fan that and create a big problem out of something that started out pretty small,” said Erickson.

Officials say there are some ways you can stay prevent a fire from occurring.

“Today is the day we gotta clean up out cigarette butts and what we really want to do is get those cleaned up throw them away properly, soak them in water and get rid of them and then that way we don’t have a flower pot take off and then start a deck fire and spread to the house,” said Erickson.

“It’s cleaning gutters making sure that stuff is not on your roof, pine trees tend to burn a lot more readily than hardwood trees so if you minimize the number of pines within 30 feet of your house that goes a long way towards helping,” McCoy said.

You can find a link to more wildfire prevention here.

Categories: Minnesota News, North Dakota News