Moorhead City Councilmembers discuss removal of aerial spraying

"The aerial spraying doesn't occur until August and so that will give us time to actually consider what sort of aerial spraying parameters and then vote on that separately."

MOORHEAD, Minn. (KVRR) — Moorhead City Council approves the city’s contract with Cass County Vector Control over mosquito spraying but votes to remove aerial spraying over concerns of harmful effects.

Cass County Vector Control has provided mosquito control service to Moorhead since 2015, but this year’s renewal is having a bit of push back over concerns of aerial spraying.

Moorhead City Council member Steve Lindaas requested a few changes to the 2021 agreement.

“I want to approve the contract with Cass County Vector Control right now so they can move forward with larval. The aerial spraying doesn’t occur until August and so that will give us time to actually consider what sort of aerial spraying parameters and then vote on that separately,” Moorhead City Council Ward 4 member Steve Lindaas said.

That motion was approved, but concerns remain over how the mosquito insecticide will continue to affect the everyday lifestyles.

“I’m again isn’t it, my son and I like to spend our summers outside; grilling, growing stuff in the garden, listening to music, having fires and the mosquito spraying happens with very little or no warning,” Brett Miller of Moorhead said.

Officials from Vector Control say the aerial spraying is a necessary part in helping keeping the mosquito population at bay.

“The aircraft is a lot quicker. We do see a little bit more thorough application when it comes to the aircraft. It’s a lot more evenly spaced out and a lot more controlled, ” Cass County Vector Control Director Ben Prather said.

Lindass adds to the community’s concern over aerial spraying.

“This spray is not particularly effective I think when you way in a cost benefit analysis is it really addressing the issue at hand,” said Lindaas.

Prather says when it comes to spraying some things are inevitable.

“We can never guarantee that we are not harming a non target that’s just unrealistic. We know for certain that is going to happen,” Prather added.

The discussion over aerial spraying will continue at the next next city council meeting on May 10th.

Fargo already extended its agreement for aerial spraying.

Categories: Local News, Minnesota News, Moorhead